Neil McCarthyNeil McCarthy is a poet/writer based in the west of Ireland. He is the co-author of two chapbooks of poetry (Voicing the Bell and Naked in Vienna) and has performed as a guest speaker at, amongst other places, the Dylan Thomas Centre, Swansea; Federation Square, Melbourne; Poetry Ireland, Dublin; and also at the Prague Fringe Festival. He is poetry has featured in many journals worldwide including The New York Quarterly and Poetry Salzburg Review. Neil will read at the Bardroom on December 2.

1. Are you currently working on anything, and why’s it taking so long?

“I’m working on a second poetry collection and that’s coming along nicely, though I would never rush it or give myself a deadline. I’m also trying to finish a travel book/political history book which has so far taken four years to get to the final few chapters as I like to visit most of the countries I’m writing about.”

2. Do you actually have moments of inspiration or is writing just a process of slogging day in and day out?

“I think moments of inspiration get the ball rolling, but for me, fine tuning a poem is walking away from the initial furious effort, and coming back to it when experience has filled in the gaps.”

3. What’s the last thing you read that made your hair stand up on end?

“My credit card bill. No seriously, my mother’s will. No, no, seriously, it’s Patrick McCabe’s latest book ‘Winterwood’. What a piece of writing.”

4. Name a writer/poet who you’d be most psyched to see show up at your Bardroom gig and how would you return the compliment if he/she liked your set?

“I’d have to say Dennis O’Driscoll (Anvil/Bloodaxe). To quote the Irish poet Stephen Murray, ‘some poets draw a fist, others shadow box around the point.’ Dennis knocks you out. Return the compliment? I’d buy the man a kebab.”

5. What would you have been if you hadn’t become a writer?

“Successful, rich and healthy.”

Niall ConnollyNiall Connolly is one of Ireland’s most exciting emerging songwriters. His debut album ‘Songs from a Corner’ (2001) went to number one in the Hot Press indie charts and helped Connolly build a loyal fan base in Ireland as well as affording him the opportunity to tour Britain and mainland Europe. His follow up ‘as tomorrow creeps from the east’ (2003) opened further doors for him. Niall will play at the Bardroom on December 2.

1. What was the first song you wrote, and how bad was it?

“I wrote my first song in the backseat of my parents Fiesta at the start of a 200 mile drive to my grandparents’ house. I was four. It went ‘How many more miles, how many minutes?Tell me quick or I’ll be sick.’ It lasted the entire journey.”

2. Are you currently working on anything, and why’s it taking so long?

“Yes, I am always working on something. I like to take my time and bring the best out of everything I write.”

3. Do you actually have moments of inspiration or is writing just a process of slogging day in and day out?

“The old cliche of, the more I practice the luckier I get. I am always on the look out for inspiration in the tiniest things so the more I slog at it the more I find.”

4. Name a writer/poet who you’d be most psyched to see show up at your Bardroom gig and how would you return the compliment if he/she liked your set?

“Leonard Cohen. John Steinbeck.

Thank you Mr. Cohen / Thank you Mr. Steinbeck.”

5. What would you have been if you hadn’t become a songwriter?

“A postman.”

Neil BarnettNeil Barrnett is an independent journalist, based in Budapest since
2000. Neil covers Central & Eastern Europe and occasionally the
Middle East for the
Spectator, Private Eye and Jane’s. He will
be reading from his first book,
Tito (Life & Times) at the upcoming Bardroom event on December 2.

1. Do you actually have moments of inspiration or is writing just a process of slogging day in and day out?

“Yes. I’m quite idle and often stumped by the meaning or explanation of events I’m looking at. When I’m reading and researching it’s often a jumble, but later when I’m staring at the ceiling or looking out of the window everything suddenly falls into place. I suspect most of the cogitation goes on while I’m asleep.”

2. What’s the last thing you read that made your hair stand up on end?

“I don’t have hair.”

3. Did you ever get laid because something you wrote?

“Yes, it was a cheque. Actually no, but open to suggestions on this point.”

4. What would you have been if you hadn’t become a writer?

“A skiing instructor in winter and sailing bum in summer.”

5. What’s the worst thing about writing a book?

“It’s pretty time consuming compared to, for example, reading a book. I’m pretty impatient and I like to be at large, so I have to be in the right mood to bury myself in the library and write.”

Budapest’s premier English-language literary event, the Bardroom, is pleased to announce the Neil³ show. Featuring three different guys with the name Neil (although not all with the same spelling), this spectacularly alliterative event will take place at 7:30 pm on Sunday December 2, at Treehugger Dan’s new premises (located within the Yellow Zebra at Lázár utca 16 in the VI. District, right behind the Opera).

Watch this space for details.

Bardroom founder David Hill wrote to inform us he had spotted UK stand-up comedian Nick Doody on YouTube performing his disturbing yet hilarious Clown Song on Paramount’s World Stands Up. Nick appeared at The Bardroom in October 2004.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.