The Bardroom has decided the best way to celebrate the Bard’s birthday would be to promote the works of Budapest’s own local talent, and so we’re staging the All-Local show featuring two of Budapest most established English writers. As usual, the show will be held at Treehugger Dan’s Used Book Shop at its new location behind the Opera, Lázár u. 16. VI. District, 7:30pm Wednesday April 23.

The show will feature readings from John Nadler’s Searching for Sofia, a non-fiction work set in aftermath of the Kosovo War. To provide some poetry to complement the fiction, we’ve invited back Gabor Gyukics, who performed at some of the very earliest Bardrooms eight years ago. We’re also pleased to welcome Irish songwriter and guitarist Jude Shiels, who is releasing his self titled debut solo record this summer.

As always, the audience can expect mind-numbing quiz questions and a ferociously competetive poetry-writing competition all of which will be rewarded with exquisite prizes.

John NadlerJohn Nadler is a Canadian-born journalist and writer living in Budapest. His first reporting job in Europe was with the English-language newspaper Budapest Week after being interviewed and hired by its then editor (and current Bardroom co-organizer) Steve Carlson. His published books include ‘Searching for Sofia’ (Random House, 2003), and A Perfect Hell (Ballantine Books, 2005). He’s currently the Budapest correspondent for TIME magazine.

1. What’s the last thing you read that made your hair stand up on end?

“My hair hasn’t been able to stand on end since 1994. Figuratively speaking, I just reread Michael Chabon’s ‘Wonder Boys’, and loved it more than the first read. It’s a runaway rail car of a book.”

2. What’s the last piece of literature that made you cry?

“The first draft of almost anything I’ve written. The most emotional thing I’ve read in recent years is Bret Easton Ellis’s ‘Lunar Park.’ This novel is like parenting: First you laugh, then you’re horrified, and at the end you weep.”

3. Name a writer/poet who you’d be most psyched to see show up at your
Bardroom gig and how would you return the compliment if he/she liked
your set?

“Canadian writer Alice Munro. She’s almost 80 years old, and gorgeous. I’d offer to have children with her.”

4. What would you have been if you hadn’t become a writer?

“Anything that promises afternoon naps and semi-unemployment.”

5. Did you ever get laid because something you wrote?

“I’m still waiting.”

Jude ShielsJude Shiels has been playing music professionally since he was 14 years of age. He sometimes plays in the touring band of his father Brush Shiels, who is a very important figure in the history of Irish rock. Jude has toured in Ireland, Britain and the USA. In 2001 Jude released an album with his brother Matthew (as the Shiels Brothers Band), called Hey Joe & Other Family Favourites. A tribute to the great blues guitar players of the late 1960′s. Jude has a new self titled album completed which he will release this summer. It brings together his folk, blues and jazz influences such as Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen and Charlie Parker and is focused on his songwriting and acoustic guitar playing.

1. What was your first (poem / piece of writing), and how bad was it?

“I was 9 years old. I wrote an essay which linked the Khlyst’s of early 20th century Russia with the troubles in Northern Ireland to members of the East German shotputter team fighting as mercenaries in the Belgian Congo and finally onto the underground rock music scene in communist Hungary in the early 1970′s, including the little known gospel movement. I submitted it for a school project and it was rejected on grounds of impartiality. It has since been published in Magyar Hírlap newspaper.”

2. Are you currently working on anything, and why’s it taking so long?

“I’ve been slaving away for years trying to put together a non-musical adaptation of Singing In The Rain. Why’s it taking so long? I can’t figure out a good title for it.”

3. What’s the last thing you read that made your hair stand up on end?

“The Castle in the Forest by Norman Mailer. A dark, demonic, depraved and deranged look at Hitler’s childhood. I loved it!”

4. What’s the last piece of literature that made you cry?

“Stop the War by Speakthe Hungarian Rapper. This guy has touched on some serious issues with sensitivity, eloquence and restraint. A big hit in Ireland.”

5. Did you ever get laid because something you wrote?

“Traditionally women have not been so interested in my mind.”

Gabor GyukicsGabor G. Gyukics is a Hungarian-American poet and literary translator. He translates American poetry to Hungarian and Hungarian poetry to American English. Thanks to an Arts Link grant he started an Open Reading series in Hungary in 1999. Gabor has translated works from Jozsef Attila, Attila Balogh, Paul Auster and Ira Cohen. His latest work is Lepkék vitrinben, released by Fekete Sas Publishing in 2006.

1. What was your first (poem / piece of writing), and how bad was it?

“Around 15 about a yellow curtain. It was so bad that my teachers liked it.”

2. Are you currently working on anything, and why’s it taking so long?

“Working on several things at once and of course none will ever end.”

3. What’s the last piece of literature that made you cry?

“Is there any such writing? Tell me about it.”

4. Name a writer/poet who you’d be most psyched to see show up at your
Bardroom gig and how would you return the compliment if he/she liked your set?

“BUKOWSKI coming out of hell to tell me how pretentiously shitty my
poems are and then I’d give him a Bee Dee.”

5. Did you ever get laid because something you wrote?

“I even got laid for things I didn’t write.”

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